Duck Confit Ravioli

Duck Confit Ravioli

Duck Confit Ravioli sounds fancy right?! This recipe is so simple and beautiful that your guests will think you spent days slaving over this meal when it really will take you no more than a hour and half to prepare.

Duck Confit is just duck legs that have been braised in their own fat. The whole process takes about three days because you have to cure the duck before you cook it. I’ve made it once and it was such a production, so you can see how excited I was when I found it in the store.

This was actually the first time I’ve made ravioli before. I’ve made tortellini, dumplings and pierogis but not ravioli. So I was due and I had to test this out. When I bought the package of pre-cooked duck confit at Costco, I knew it was destined for raviolis but I didn’t realize you needed the equipment for it. So then I had to buy a ravioli maker. Worth it. Although next time I may free form them and stamp them out.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Just simply savory and gorgeous.

I decided to go all out for this “fancy meal”, I say fancy because it looks fancy but it really is a simple meal to make. This cremini mushroom sauce is a winner that I just want to drink. It will go on everything and is the perfect accompaniment for this recipe.

Duck Confit Ravioli

We paired this with an ‘Unoaked’ Chardonnay and Syrah. The pairing was heaven.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 25 minutes

Yield: Makes 48 ravioli

Duck Confit Ravioli

This recipe will make a large portion, we did about 48 ravioli. It's tedious work but if you have helping hands the work goes faster. All in all when we were testing this recipe it took about a hour. If it's your first time making ravioli have patience and know that the end result is worth it. Have fun with this recipe, pour yourself a glass of wine, put on some music and go to work. Cheers!

Ingredients

    For the Pasta
  • 3 cups Flour
  • 3 whole Eggs
  • 2 tablespoons Olive Oil
  • 2 tablespoons Water
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher Salt
    For the Ravioli Filling
  • 1-2 pounds Duck Confit Legs, shredded {I bought mine pre-cooked from Costco}
  • 1 whole Egg
  • 1/2 cup Ricotta
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan, grated
  • 1 teaspoon Thyme Leaves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon Parsley Leaves, minced
    For the Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Olive Oil
  • 1 whole Shallot, chopped
  • 1 package Cremini Mushrooms, quartered
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced or grated
  • 1 teaspoon Thyme Leaves, minced
  • 1/2 cup Dry White Wine
  • 1 cup Vegetable Stock
  • 1 cup Heavy Whipping Cream
  • Kosher Salt and Ground Black Pepper, for seasoning
  • Micro Kale, for garnish
  • Grated Parmesan, for garnish

Instructions

  1. On a clean work surface, like a large cutting board or counter, pile the flour up and use a fork to create a well in the middle with high raised sides. Crack the eggs into the well. Add the olive oil, water and kosher salt. Using a fork, beat the egg to slowly incorporate the flour by pulling it in from the sides of the well. As you continue to pull more flour and mix, the dough will start coming together. Using your hands, the fork or a bench scraper, work the dough until it comes together. Add more flour if it is sticky, add a few splashes of water if it is too dry.
  2. Knead the dough for 8 - 10 minutes until smooth and elastic. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set aside for 20 minutes to rest.
  3. While the dough is resting make the ravioli filling. {The pre-cooked duck confit from the store is great because you can just warm it under the broiler and shed it for this recipe.} Add the shredded duck confit to a medium sized bowl and add the egg, ricotta, parmesan, thyme and parsley. Fold the ingredients together until combined. Set aside
  4. Sprinkle a large sheet pan with flour or cornmeal. Unwrap pasta and cut into four sections. You will work with one section at a time. Wrap the remaining three up in plastic in the mean time so your dough won't dry out. Flour your work surface and roll out the dough with a floured rolling pin, working from the middle and rolling out. Try to get the thinnest and longest piece of dough you can to cut into two pieces for a frame. Keep rotating and turning the dough to prevent sticking. If using a ravioli maker like myself you'll need 2 long rectangle shapes.
  5. Once your dough is rolled very thin, place one strip of the dough over your ravioli frame and press the dough into the frame with the indented tray. Fill each indent with about a teaspoon of duck confit filling. Try your best not to overfill! Place the second strip of pasta over the strip with filling. Press strips together with your fingers.
  6. Using a rolling pin gently roll the pin over the frame until the frame is visible. Remove ravioli and trim out the squares using a knife or ravioli cutter. You may have to pinch the sides of the ravioli to make sure it's sealed. Place the ravioli on the floured or cornmeal sheet pan. Remove the excess dough and re-roll. Repeat the process until dough and filling is used. Let ravioli dry for 20 minutes before cooking. {Ravioli may be frozen at this point for later use.}
  7. To cook, bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Drop in your raviolis and stir gently. Cook for about 5 minutes and drain well. Pour back into the hot pot and drizzle with a little olive oil to prevent from sticking. Place on the warm burner just to keep warm while making the sauce. {You don’t need the burner on!}
  8. In a large pan, heat the olive oil over medium high heat. Add the chopped shallot and quartered cremini mushrooms, cook until mushrooms begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and thyme and cook while stirring until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the white wine and deglaze the pan. Bring wine to a boil in the pan and reduce for about 2 minutes. Add the vegetable stock, bring to a boil in the pan and simmer for 2 minutes. Turn heat down to low and add the cream. Simmer on low for 3 minutes until sauce is thickened. If too thick add a splash more of vegetable stock. Season with a pinch of kosher salt and black pepper.
  9. Pour sauce over the cooked ravioli and serve with grated parmesan and micro kale for garnish. {Micro kale can be found at your local grocery store in the salad or greens section. Such a fun garnish that tastes delicious and looks impressive on a plate.}
https://dashofsavory.com/duck-confit-ravioli/

On a clean work surface, like a large cutting board or counter, pile the flour up and use a fork to create a well in the middle with high raised sides. Crack the eggs into the well. Add the olive oil, water and kosher salt.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Using a fork, beat the egg to slowly incorporate the flour by pulling it in from the sides of the well. As you continue to pull more flour and mix, the dough will start coming together.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Using your hands, the fork or a bench scraper, work the dough until it comes together. Add more flour if it is sticky, add a few splashes of water if it is too dry.
Knead the dough for 8 – 10 minutes until smooth and elastic.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set aside for 20 minutes to rest.

Duck Confit Ravioli
While the dough is resting make the ravioli filling.

Duck Confit Ravioli

{The pre-cooked duck confit from the store is great because you can just warm it under the broiler and shed it for this recipe.}

Duck Confit Ravioli

Gorgeous broiled duck legs fresh out of the oven. The smell in your kitchen will be mouth-watering and you’re welcome.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Add the shredded duck confit to a medium sized bowl and add the egg, ricotta, parmesan, thyme and parsley. Fold the ingredients together until combined. Set aside
Sprinkle a large sheet pan with flour or cornmeal. Unwrap pasta and cut into four sections.

Duck Confit Ravioli

You will work with one section at a time. Wrap the remaining three up in plastic in the mean time so your dough won’t dry out. Flour your work surface and roll out the dough with a floured rolling pin, working from the middle and rolling out.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Try to get the thinnest and longest piece of dough you can to cut into two pieces for a frame. Keep rotating and turning the dough to prevent sticking. If using a ravioli maker like myself you’ll need 2 long rectangle shapes.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Once your dough is rolled very thin, place one strip of the dough over your ravioli frame and press the dough into the frame with the indented tray.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Fill each indent with about a teaspoon of duck confit filling.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Try your best not to overfill!

Duck Confit Ravioli

Place the second strip of pasta over the strip with filling. Press strips together with your fingers.
Using a rolling pin gently roll the pin over the frame until the frame is visible. Remove ravioli and trim out the squares using a knife or ravioli cutter.

Duck Confit Ravioli

You may have to pinch the sides of the ravioli to make sure it’s sealed. Place the ravioli on the floured or cornmeal sheet pan. Remove the excess dough and re-roll. Repeat the process until dough and filling is used. Let ravioli dry for 20 minutes before cooking.

{Ravioli may be frozen at this point for later use.}
To cook, bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Drop in your raviolis and stir gently. Cook for about 5 minutes and drain well. Pour back into the hot pot and drizzle with a little olive oil to prevent from sticking. Place on the warm burner just to keep warm while making the sauce.

{You don’t need the burner on!}
In a large pan, heat the olive oil over medium high heat. Add the chopped shallot and quartered cremini mushrooms, cook until mushrooms begin to brown, about 5 minutes.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Add the garlic and thyme and cook while stirring until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the white wine and deglaze the pan. Bring wine to a boil in the pan and reduce for about 2 minutes.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Add the vegetable stock, bring to a boil in the pan and simmer for 2 minutes.

Duck Confit Ravioli

Turn heat down to low and add the cream. Simmer on low for 3 minutes until sauce is thickened. If too thick add a splash more of vegetable stock. Season with a pinch of kosher salt and black pepper.

Pour sauce over the cooked ravioli and serve with grated parmesan and micro kale for garnish.

Duck Confit Ravioli

{Micro kale can be found at your local grocery store in the salad or greens section. Such a fun garnish that tastes delicious and looks impressive on a plate.}

Savor and Enjoy!



7 thoughts on “Duck Confit Ravioli”

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  • Hi there! I am planning on making this dish this weekend. I only have 3 legs (“D’artagnan, just like you used) how many legs did you use in your recipe? In other words, how much do i need to reduce the other ingredients for the filling by?Thanks!!

    • Hi Angel! Great question, I used 4 whole duck legs but keep in mind that they can be smaller or larger than yours depending on where you get them from. I would suggest just eye balling it because it makes a whole lot of filling anyways and it all turns out delicious! If you like more cheese than duck ratio (as you can see mine is mostly duck) then adjust as needed and vice versa. Let me know if you have anymore questions. Cheers!

  • We made this tonight with the legs of some ducks I shot earlier this fall. I Made the confit a few days ago and put the ravioli together last night. Your recipe was easy to follow, and with the confit and ravioli out of the way in the days before, the dish came together quickly.

    The ingredients and ratios were spot on; It was rich and the flavors were pleasantly complex. The only substitution I made was duck stock for vegetable stock, which I don’t think had a huge impact on the end result.

    Thanks for the post. We can’t wait to try more of your recipes! A++ keep up the great work!

    • Thanks Tim! Awesome substitution of duck stock, I will definitely try that. If you have a few extra ducks at the end of the season feel free to send them my way ;) Cheers!

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